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Legal Dictionary
borrow
Definition of borrow

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: bŏrʹō, IPA: /ˈbɒrəʊ/, SAMPA: /"bQr@U/
  • (US) enPR: bärʹō, IPA: /ˈbɑroʊ/, SAMPA: /"bAroU/
  • Rhymes: -ɒrəʊ

Etymology 1

    From Old English borgian, from Proto-Germanic. Cognate with German borgen.

Verb

to borrow (third-person singular simple present borrows, present participle borrowing, simple past and past participle borrowed)

  1. To receive (something) from somebody temporarily, expecting to return it.
  2. To adopt (an idea) as one's own.
  3. (linguistics) To copy a word from another language.
  4. (arithmetic) In a subtraction, to deduct (one) from a digit of the minuend and add ten to the following digit, in order that the subtraction of a larger digit in the subtrahend from the digit in the minuend to which ten is added gives a positive result.

Synonyms

  • (adopt): adopt, use

Antonyms

  • (receive temporarily): give back (exchanging the transfer of ownership), lend (exchanging the owners), return (exchanging the transfer of ownership)
  • (in arithmetic): carry (the equivalent reverse procedure in the inverse operation of addition)

Derived terms

Etymology 2

    From Old English borg, from Proto-Germanic (related to Etymology 1, above).

Noun

borrow (plural borrows)

  1. (archaic) A ransom; a pledge or guarantee.
  2. (archaic) A surety; someone standing bail.

    * 1819: "where am I to find such a sum? If I sell the very pyx and candlesticks on the altar at Jorvaulx, I shall scarce raise the half; and it will be necessary for that purpose that I go to Jorvaulx myself; ye may retain as borrows my two priests." - Walter Scott, Ivanhoe

Source: Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.




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