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Legal Dictionary

derogate

Legal Definition of derogate

Related terms


Definition of derogate

Etymology

    From (the participle stem of) Latin d"rogāre (“to annul, repeal part of a law, take away, detract from”), from de- (“from”) + rogāre (“to propose a law, ask”).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA: /ˈdɛɹəɡeɪt/

Verb

derogate (third-person singular simple present derogates, present participle derogating, simple past and past participle derogated)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To partially repeal (a law etc.). [16th-17th c.]
  2. (transitive) To detract from (something); to disparage, belittle. [from 16th c.]
  3. (transitive) To take away (something from something else) in a way which leaves it lessened. [from 16th c.]
  4. (intransitive) To remove a part, to detract from (a quality of excellence, authority etc.). [from 16th c.]
  5. (intransitive) To act in a manner below oneself; to debase oneself. [from 17th c.]

Usage notes

The verb form is relatively uncommon, but the related adjective derogatory is common.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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