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Legal Dictionary

nolo contendere

Legal Definition of nolo contendere

Etymology

    Latin Origin

Noun

  1. "I will not defend it." Used primarily in criminal proceedings whereby the defendant declines to refute the evidence of the prosecution. In some jurisdictions, this response by the defendant has same effect as a plea of guilty.

Synonyms


Definition of nolo contendere

Etymology

    Directly from Latin nolo contendere (“I do not wish to contend”).

Noun

nolo contendere (plural nolo contenderes)

  1. (law) No contest. The designation of a plea that means that the defendant does not admit the charge, but has no means to dispute it that the court will recognize.

Further reading

Nolo contendere is a legal term that comes from the Latin for "I do not wish to contend." It is also referred to as a plea of no contest.

In criminal trials, and in some common law jurisdictions, it is a plea where the defendant neither admits nor disputes a charge, serving as an alternative to a pleading of guilty or not guilty.

A no-contest plea, while not technically a guilty plea, has the same immediate effect as a guilty plea, and is often offered as a part of a plea bargain. In many jurisdictions a plea of nolo contendere is not a right, and carries various restrictions on its use.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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