Advertisement
Legal Dictionary

premise

Legal Definition of premise

See also


Definition of premise

Etymology

    From Middle English, from Old French premisse, from Medieval Latin premissa (“set before”) (premissa propositio (“the proposition set before”)), feminine past participle of Latin premittere (“to send or put before”), from pre- (“before”) + mittere (“to send”)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: prĕ'mĭs, IPA: /ˈpɹɛ.mɪs/, SAMPA: /"pr\E.mIs/

Noun

premise (plural premises)

  1. A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.
  2. (logic) Any of the first propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is deduced.
  3. (usually plural, law) Matters previously stated or set forth; esp., that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.
  4. (usually plural) A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts (in this sense, used most often in the plural form).

    trespass on another's premises

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



SHARE THIS PAGE


TOP LEGAL TERMS THIS WEEK
1.     AORO
2.     Miranda warning
3.     adjudication order
4.     stare decisis
5.     lex patriae
6.     appellant
7.     bankruptcy
8.     precedent
9.     culpability
10.     parol evidence rule