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Legal Dictionary

quit

Definition of quit

Etymology

    From Anglo-Norman quiter, Old French quiter, from quite (“acquited, quit”).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kwĭt, IPA: /kwɪt/, SAMPA: /kwIt/
  • Audio (US) [?]
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Verb

quit (third-person singular simple present quits, present participle quitting, simple past and past participle quit or quitted)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To pay (a debt, fine etc.).
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To repay (someone) for (something).
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To repay, pay back (a good deed, injury etc.).
  4. (reflexive, archaic) To conduct oneself, acquit oneself, to behave (in a specified way).
  5. (transitive) To abandon, renounce (a thing).
  6. (transitive) To leave (a place).
  7. (transitive, intransitive) To resign from (a job, office, position, etc.).

    After having to work overtime without being paid, I quit my job.

  8. (transitive, intransitive) To stop, give up (an activity) (usually + gerund or verbal noun).

    John is planning to quit smoking.

  9. (transitive, computing) To close (an application).
  10. Simple past tense and past participle of quit.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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