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Legal Dictionary

supersede

Definition of supersede

Etymology

    From Middle French superseder (“postpone, defer”), from Latin supersedere, from super (“over”) + sedere (“to sit”). The meaning “to replace” is from 1642, probably by association with unrelated precede - note that ‘c' instead of ‘s' (from cedere (“to go”), not sedere (“to sit”)). As a result, supercede is a common misspelling - see therein for further discussion.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /suwpɹ̩ˈsijd/, IPA: /ˌsuːpəˈsiːd/[1]
  • Rhymes: -iːd

Verb

supersede (third-person singular simple present supersedes, present participle superseding, simple past and past participle superseded)

  1. (transitive) Set (something) aside.
  2. (transitive) Take the place of.

    No one could supersede his sister.

  3. (transitive) Displace in favour of another.

    Modern US culture has superseded the native forms.

Usage notes

  • Supersede is the only English word ending in sede. Similar words include four ending in ceed, and several ending in cede (apart from seed). Because of this, supercede is a common misspelling of this word.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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