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Legal Dictionary

transitive

Definition of transitive

Etymology

    Latin trans ("across") + itus, from eo ("to go")

Pronunciation

Adjective

transitive (not comparable)

  1. Making a transit or passage.

    For all symbols are fluxional; all language is vehicular and transitive, and is good, as ferries and horses are, for conveyance, not as farms and houses are, for homestead. - Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Poet

  2. Affected by transference of signification.

    By far the greater part of the transitive or derivative applications of words depend on casual and unaccountable caprices of the feelings or the fancy. - John Stuart Mill

  3. (grammar): Of a verb, that takes an object or objects. (compare with: intransitive.)

    I read the book. (read is a transitive verb)
    I read. (read is an intransitive verb)
    Men have tried to turn "revolutionise" from a transitive to an intransitive verb. - G. K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

  4. (set theory): Of a relation R on a set S, such that if xRy and yRz, then xRz for all members x, y and z of S (that is, if the relation applies from one element to a second, and from the second to a third, then it also applies from the first element to the third).

    "Is an ancestor of" is a transitive relation.

Antonyms

  • (making a transit or passage):
  • (affected by transference of signification):
  • (grammar): intransitive
  • (set theory): intransitive, nontransitive

Derived terms

  • ditransitive
  • monotransitive
  • complex transitive
  • transitively
  • transitiveness
  • transitive verb

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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