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Legal Dictionary

treason

Definition of treason

Etymology

    From Anglo-Norman treson, from Old French traison (French: trahison), from Latin traditio ("a giving up, surrender, delivery, tradition"), from tradere ("to give up, deliver over, betray"); see tradition, of which treason is a doublet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈtriː.zən/
  • Rhymes: -iːzən

Noun

treason (plural treasons)

  1. The crime of betraying one's government.

    "Formerly, the punishment for high treason was of a most barbarous character…. Women were burnt. A male traitor was dragged or drawn to the place of execution and hanged; but while still alive, he was cut down and disembowelled. His head was then severed from his body which was quartered. The head and quarters, which were at the Kings disposal, were usually exposed in some conspicuous place-the Temple Bar being a favourite spot-after being boiled in salt to prevent putrification and in cumin seed to prevent birds feasting on them."
    1952: James Avery Joyce: Justice At Work: (this edition Pan 1957) Page 105.

  2. Providing aid and comfort to the enemy.

Related terms

  • tradition
  • traitor
  • traitorous
  • treasonable

See also

Further reading

In law, treason is the crime that covers some of the more serious acts of disloyalty to one's sovereign or nation. Historically, treason also covered the murder of specific social superiors, such as the murder of a husband by his wife (treason against the king was known as high treason and treason against a lesser superior was petit treason). A person who commits treason is known in law as a traitor.

Oran's Dictionary of the Law (1983) defines treason as: "...[a]...citizen's actions to help a foreign government overthrow, make war against, or seriously injure the [parent nation]." In many nations, it is also often considered treason to attempt or conspire to overthrow the government, even if no foreign country is aided or involved by such an endeavour.

Outside legal spheres, the word "traitor" may also be used to describe a person who betrays (or is accused of betraying) their own political party, nation, family, friends, ethnic group, team, religion, social class, or other group to which they may belong. Often, such accusations are controversial and disputed, as the person may not identify with the group of which they are a member, or may otherwise disagree with the group leaders making the charge. See, for example, race traitor.

At times, the term "traitor" has been levelled as a political epithet, regardless of any verifiable treasonable action. In a civil war or insurrection, the winners may deem the losers to be traitors. Likewise the term "traitor" is used in heated political discussion - typically as a slur against political dissidents, or against officials in power who are perceived as failing to act in the best interest of their constituents. In certain cases, as with the German Dolchstoßlegende, the accusation of treason towards a large group of people can be a unifying political message.

In English law, high treason was punishable by being hanged, drawn and quartered (men) or burnt at the stake (women), the only crime which attracted those penalties (until the Treason Act 1814). The penalty was used by later monarchs against people who could reasonably be called traitors, although most modern jurists would call it excessive. Many of them would now just be considered dissidents.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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