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Legal Dictionary

videlicet

Legal Definition of videlicet

Etymology

    Latin Origin

Adverb

  1. "To wit" or "That is to say." "viz.", which is the abbreviation of videlicet, is much more commonly used. It is often found in legal documents to advise that what follows provides more detail about a preceding general statement.

    Example: "The defendant committed adultery; viz., on April 18th, at approximately 10:45 pm, he had sexual intercourse with Ms Jane Doe."

Synonyms


Definition of videlicet

Etymology

    Latin, from vide- (stem of videre (“see”)) + licet (“it is permissible”).

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /vɪˈdɛlɪsɛt/

Adverb

videlicet (not comparable)

  1. That is to say; viz.

    * 1993, Anthony Burgess, A Dead Man in Deptford:
    My father did speak much of the day he was not speedily to forget, videlicet May Day of 1517, when there was great apprentice rioting against insolent foreigners.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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