Advertisement
Legal Dictionary

ballot

Definition of ballot

Etymology

    From Italian ballotta, a small ball used to register a vote. Not voting. The ballota was a ball drawn from an urn to select at random, by lottery, a person for a role.
    Ref: See, for instance, p166 J J Norwich, 'History of Venice' Penguin 1983

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈbælət/, SAMPA: /"b{l@t/

Noun

ballot (plural ballots)

  1. a paper or card used to cast a vote
  2. the process of voting, especially in secret
  3. (chiefly US) a list of candidates running for office; a ticket
  4. the total of all votes cast in an election

Verb

to ballot (third-person singular simple present ballots, present participle balloting, simple past and past participle balloted)

  1. to vote
  2. to draw lots

Further reading

A ballot is a device (originally a small ball) used to record choices made by voters. Each voter uses one ballot, and ballots are not shared. In the simplest elections, a ballot may be a simple scrap of paper on which each voter writes in the name of a candidate, but governmental elections use pre-printed to protect the secrecy of the votes. The voter casts his/her ballot in a box at a polling station. In British English, this is usually called a "ballot paper". The word "ballot" is used for an election process within an organisation (such as a trade union "holding a ballot" of its members).

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



SHARE THIS PAGE


TOP LEGAL TERMS THIS WEEK
1.     abscond
2.     AORO
3.     doctrine of stare decisis
4.     adjudication order
5.     civil law
6.     tenancy in common
7.     desponent
8.     Miranda warning
9.     stare decisis
10.     Farmer's law