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Legal Dictionary

chattel

Legal Definition of chattel

Noun

  1. Moveable items of property which are neither land nor permanently attached to land or a building, either directly or vicariously through attachment to real property. A piano is chattel but an apartment building, a tree or a concrete building foundation are not. The opposite of chattel is real property which includes lands or buildings. All property which is not real property is said to be chattel. "Personalty" or "personal property" are other words sometimes used to describe the concept of chattel. The word "chattel" came from the feudal era when "cattle" was the most valuable property besides land.

Definition of chattel

Etymology

    Middle English chatel < Old French chatel< Latin capitale. Compare cattle, which is from an Anglo-Norman variant.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈtʃŠt.əl/, SAMPA: /"tS{t.@l/
  • Rhymes: -Štəl

Adjective

chattel (comparative more chattel, superlative most chattel)

  1. Commonly used to describe the treatment of Russian serfs as property.

Noun

chattel (plural chattels)

  1. Tangible, movable property.
  2. A slave.

Anagrams

  • Alphagram: acehltt
  • latchet

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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