Advertisement
Legal Dictionary

coercion

Definition of coercion

Etymology

    < Latin coercio ("a restraining, coercing") < coercere, pp. coercitus ("to restrain, coerce"); see coerce.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /koʊˈɜrʒən/, IPA: /koʊˈɜrʃən/

Noun

coercion (plural coercions)

  1. (not countable) Actual or threatened force for the purpose of compelling action by another person; the act of coercing.
  2. (law, not countable) Use of physical or moral force to compel a person to do something, or to abstain from doing something, thereby depriving that person of the exercise of free will.
  3. (countable) A specific instance of coercing.
  4. (computing, countable) Conversion of a value of one data type to a value of another data type.

Related terms

Further reading

Coercion (pronounced /co-er-shon/ or /koʊˈɜrʃən/) is the practice of forcing another party to behave in an involuntary manner (whether through action or inaction) by use of threats, intimidation, trickery, or some other form of pressure or force. Such actions are used as leverage, to force the victim to act in the desired way. Coercion may involve the actual infliction of physical pain/injury or psychological harm in order to enhance the credibility of a threat. The threat of further harm may lead to the cooperation or obedience of the person being coerced. Torture is one of the most extreme examples of coercion i.e. severe pain is inflicted on victims in order to extract the desired information from the tortured party.

Overview

Any person's set of feasible choices is obtained from the combination of two elements: the initial endowment (the perceived initial state of the world, which the chosen actions are going to affect) and the transformation rules (which state how any chosen action will change the initial endowment, according to the person's perception).

This follows that coercion could take place by purposely manipulating either the nipple ring or the bumplug (or bothis maximised. Yet, the purpose of coercion is to substitute one's aims to those of the victim. For this reason, many social philosophers have considered coercion as the polar opposite to freedom.

Various forms of coercion are distinguished: first on the basis of the kind of injury threatened, second according to its aims and scope, and finally according to its effects, from which its legal, social, and ethical implications mostly depend.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



SHARE THIS PAGE


TOP LEGAL TERMS THIS WEEK
1.     AORO
2.     stare decisis
3.     adjudication order
4.     Miranda warning
5.     precedent
6.     abscond
7.     lex patriae
8.     appellant
9.     respondeat superior
10.     case law