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Legal Dictionary

death

Legal Definition of death

See also


Definition of death

Etymology

    Old English dēaş, from Proto-Germanic *dauşuz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰautus. Cognate with West Frisian dead, Dutch dood, German Tod, Swedish död, Greek θάνατος.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dĕth, IPA: /dɛθ/, SAMPA: /dET/
  • Audio (US) [?]
  • Rhymes: -ɛθ

Noun

death (plural deaths)

  1. The cessation of life and all associated processes; the end of an organism's existence as an entity independent from its environment and its return to an inert, nonliving state.

    The death of my grandmother saddened the whole family.

  2. (often capitalized) The personification of death as a hooded figure with a scythe; the Grim Reaper.

    When death walked in, a chill spread through the room.

  3. Tarot card.

Anagrams

  • Alphagram: adeht
  • hated

Further reading

Death is the termination of the biological functions that define a living organism. It refers both to a particular event and to the condition that results thereby. The true nature of the latter has for millennia been a central concern of the world's religious traditions and of philosophical enquiry. Belief in some kind of afterlife or rebirth is a central aspect of many religious traditions. Within the scientific community, many suppose death to terminate mind or consciousness. The effect of physical death on any possible mind or soul remains for many an open question. Cognitive science has yet to explain fully the origin and nature of consciousness; any view about the existence or non-existence of consciousness after death remains speculative.

Humans and the vast majority of other animals die in due course from senescence. Remarkable exceptions include the hydra, and the jellyfish turritopsis nutricula, which is thought to possess in effect biological immortality.

Intervening phenomena which commonly bring about death earlier include malnutrition, disease, or accidents resulting in terminal physical injury. Predation is a cause of death for many species. Intentional human activity causing death includes suicide, homicide, and war. Roughly 150,000 people die each day across the globe. Death in the natural world can also occur as an indirect result of human activity: an increasing cause of species depletion in recent times has been destruction of ecosystems as a consequence of the widening spread of industrial technology.

Physiological death is now seen as less an event than a process: conditions once considered indicative of death are now reversible. Where in the process a dividing line is drawn between life and death depends on factors beyond the presence or absence of vital signs. In general, clinical death is neither necessary nor sufficient for a determination of legal death. A patient with working heart and lungs determined to be brain dead can be pronounced legally dead without clinical death occurring. Precise medical definition of death, in other words, becomes more problematic, paradoxically, as scientific knowledge and technology advance.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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