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Legal Dictionary

declare

Definition of declare

Etymology

    From French déclarer, from Latin d"clārāre (“to make clear”), from de- + clārus (“clear”).

Pronunciation

Verb

declare (third-person singular simple present declares, present participle declaring, simple past and past participle declared)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To make clear, explain, interpret.

    * 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew XV:
    Then answered Peter and sayd to him: declare unto us thys parable.

  2. (intransitive) To make a declaration.
  3. (transitive) To announce one's support, choice, opinion, etc.

    He declared him innocent.

  4. (transitive) To announce something formally or officially.

    declare bankruptcy
    declare victory

  5. (transitive) To affirm or state something emphatically.
  6. (transitive) To inform government customs or taxation officials of goods one is importing or of income, expenses, or other circumstances affecting one's taxes.

    * 1984, Richard Woodbury and Anastasia Toufexis, "Law: The Trouble with Harry," Time, 2 April:
    The prosecution has introduced evidence, including canceled checks, to show that the judge failed to declare part of his income.

  7. (transitive) To make outstanding debts, e.g. taxes, payable.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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