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Legal Dictionary

enforce

Definition of enforce

Etymology

    From Old French enforcier, from Late Latin infortiāre, from in- + fortis ("strong").

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA: /ɪnˈfɔːs/
  • Rhymes: -enforce

Verb

to enforce (third-person singular simple present enforces, present participle enforcing, simple past and past participle enforced)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To strengthen (a castle, town etc.) with extra troops, fortifications etc.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To intensify, make stronger, add force to.
  3. (obsolete, reflexive) To exert oneself, to try hard.

    * 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VII:
    I pray you enforce youreselff at that justis that ye may be beste, for my love.

  4. To keep up, impose or bring into effect something, not necessarily by force.

    The police are there to enforce the law.

  5. To give strength or force to; to affirm

    The victim was able to enforce his evidence against the alleged perpetrator.

Derived terms

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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