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Legal Dictionary

foreign

Definition of foreign

Etymology

    Middle English forein from Old French forain, from Vulgar Latin *forānus, from Latin forās, forīs (“outside (the doors)”). Displaced native Middle English elendish, ellendish "foreign" (from Old English elelendisc, compare Old English ellende "foreign", elland "foreign land"), Middle English eltheodi, eltheodish "foreign" (from Old English elþ"odiġ, elþ"odisc "foreign"), and non-native Middle English peregrin "foreign" (from Old French peregrin).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA: /ˈf'ɹən/, SAMPA: /"fQr@n/
  • (GenAm) IPA: /ˈf"ːɹən/, SAMPA: /"fO:r@n/
  • Audio (US) [?]
  • Audio (UK) [?]
  • Rhymes: -'rən, -'rɪn
  • Hyphenation: for‧eign

Adjective

foreign (comparative more foreign, superlative most foreign)

  1. From a different country.

    There are many more foreign students in Europe since the Erasmus scheme started.

  2. belonging to a different culture.

    Eating with chopsticks was a foreign concept to him.

  3. Of an object, etc, in a place where it does not belong.

    foreign body

  4. (US, state law) From a different one of the states of the United States, as of a state of residence or incorporation.
  5. Belonging to a different organization, company etc.

    My bank charges me $2.50 every time I use a foreign ATM.

Synonyms

  • (from a different country): overseas, international
  • (belonging to a different culture): alien, fremd
  • (in a place where it does not belong): extraneous

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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