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Legal Dictionary

implicit

Definition of implicit

Etymology

    From French or from Latin implicitus, past participle of implico ("to infold, involve, entangle"); see implicate.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ɪmˈplɪsɪt/, SAMPA: /Im"plIsIt/
  • Audio (US) [?]
  • Rhymes: -ɪsɪt

Adjective

implicit (not comparable)

  1. Implied indirectly, without being directly expressed

    * 1983, Ronald Reagan, Proclamation 5018
    The Bible and its teachings helped form the basis for the Founding Fathers' abiding belief in the inalienable rights of the individual, rights which they found implicit in the Bible's teachings of the inherent worth and dignity of each individual.

  2. Contained in the essential nature of something but not openly shown
  3. Having no reservations or doubts; unquestioning or unconditional; usually said of faith or trust.

    * 1765, Anonymous, Considerations on Behalf of the Colonists
    He is not only a zealous advocate for pusilanimous and passive obedience, but for the most implicit faith in the dictatorial mandates of power.

  4. (obsolete) entangled, twisted together.

Synonyms

  • (implied indirectly): implied, unspoken
  • (contained in the essential nature): inherent, intrinsic
  • (having no reservations): unconditional, unquestioning

Antonyms

Related terms

  • implicate
  • implication
  • implicative
  • implicitly
  • implicitness
  • imply

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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