Advertisement
Legal Dictionary

real estate

Legal Definition of real estate

Related terms


Definition of real estate

Etymology

    real; from French royale, from Latin regalis, royal, regal, from combining form reg- (nominative rex), king, + adjective suffix -alis
    estate; from Latin status, condition, state

In spite of the name, real estate has no connection with the concept of reality. It derives instead from the feudal principle that in a monarchy, all land was considered the property of the king. Thus originally the term real estate was equivalent to "royal estate", real originating from the French royale, as it was the French-speaking Normans who introduced feudalism to England in the 11th century and thus the English language; cognate to Spanish real.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: /rēl' əstāt"/, IPA: /ˈriːl əˌsteɪt/

Noun

real estate (uncountable)

  1. Property that cannot easily be moved, usually buildings and the ground they are built on.
  2. (informal, loosely) Available space.
    * 2007, Preston Gralla, Big Book of Windows Hacks
    Virtual desktops allow you to stretch your screen real estate well beyond its normal size.

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • personalty

Related terms

Further reading

Real estate is a legal term (in some jurisdictions, such as the USA, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and The Bahamas) that encompasses land along with improvements to the land, such as buildings,fences, wells and other site improvements that are fixed in location -- immovable. Real estate law is the body of regulations and legal codes which pertain to such matters under a particular jurisdiction and include things such as commercial and residential real property transactions. Real estate is often considered synonymous with real property (sometimes called realty), in contrast with personal property (sometimes called chattel or personalty under chattel law or personal property law).

However, in some situations the term "real estate" refers to the land and fixture s together, as distinguished from "real property," referring to ownership of land and appurtenances, including anything of a permanent nature such as structures, trees, minerals, and the interest, benefits, and inherent rights thereof. Real property is typically considered to be Immovable property The terms real estate and real property are used primarily in common law, while civil law jurisdictions refer instead to immovable property.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



SHARE THIS PAGE


TOP LEGAL TERMS THIS WEEK
1.     AORO
2.     adjudication order
3.     tenancy in common
4.     abscond
5.     stare decisis
6.     lex domicilii
7.     Miranda warning
8.     minimum contacts
9.     civil law
10.     receiving order