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Legal Dictionary

void ab initio

Legal Definition of void ab initio

Latin phrase

  1. Not legally binding. A document that is void is useless and worthless; as if it did not exist.

    Example: In many countries, contracts for immoral purposes are said to be "void": unenforceable and not recognized by the courts. A good example is a contract to commit a serious crime such as murder

Related terms


Definition of void ab initio

Further reading

Black's Law Dictionary defines void ab initio as:

    Void ab initio. A contract is null from the beginning if it seriously offends law or public policy in contrast to a contract which is merely voidable at the election of one of the parties to the contract.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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