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Legal Dictionary

de jure

Legal Definition of de jure

Etymology

    Latin Origin

Adjective

  1. "Of the law." The term has come to describe a total adherence of the law.

    Example: A de jure government is one which has been created in respect of constitutional law and is in all ways legitimate even though a de facto government may be in control

Etymology

    Latin origin

Related terms

  1. jure
  2. ipso jure

Definition of de jure

Etymology

    Latin "according to law".

Adjective

de jure (not comparable)

  1. By right.
  2. In accordance with the law.

Antonyms

Further reading

De jure (in Classical Latin de iure) is an expression that means "concerning law", as contrasted with de facto, which means "concerning fact".

The terms de jure and de facto are used instead of "in principle" and "in practice", respectively, when one is describing political or legal situations.

In a legal context, de jure is also translated as "concerning law". A practice may exist de facto, where for example the people obey a contract as though there were a law enforcing it yet there is no such law. A process known as "desuetude" may allow de facto practices to replace obsolete laws. On the other hand, practices may exist de jure and not be obeyed or observed by the people.

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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