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Legal Dictionary

de novo

Legal Definition of de novo

Etymology

    Latin Origin

Adjective

  1. New. This term is used to refer to a trial which starts over, which wipes the slate clean and begins all over again, as if any previous partial or complete hearing had not occurred.

Etymology

    Latin origin

Definition of de novo

Etymology

    From the Latin adverb dē novō ("from the new"); from ("from") + novō, the ablative singular of novus ("new").

Pronunciation

  • (RP) IPA: /deɪˈnəʊvəʊ/, /dəˈnəʊvəʊ/
  • (US) IPA: /deɪˈnoʊvoʊ/, /dəˈnoʊvoʊ/

Adjective

de novo (not comparable)

  1. Anew, afresh, from the beginning; without consideration of previous instances, proceedings or determinations.

    De novo kidney transplantation.
    De novo prediction of three-dimensional structures for major protein families.
    He filed a motion for a de novo hearing.

Usage notes

  • Because this is a Latin phrase, it is often italicized when written (i.e., de novo). In law, de novo is the most rigorous of the three standards by which common law court decisions are reviewed on appeal; the other two are clear error and abuse of discretion.

See also

References:

  1. Wiktionary. Published under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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